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Thursday
May152014

THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE

Tickets: NAC Box Office

By now, on the great day—June 14--it will be 2 p.m. Listeners will have gone out, had lunch in some neighbouring restaurant, come back. I was nervous about this when we told The Odyssey, afraid that audience members would not be able to keep to the schedule, aware of just how tight our timing was. I need not have worried. Everyone was so eager. Once we had got started, no one wanted to miss a word. They were there in their seats, ready to continue on the journey, ready to live within them all that Homer could bring.

So what does come after lunch? As I write I am aware of how reluctant I am to give away the actual story. I note that I do not really wish even to name names. Achilles, Agamemnon, Hector, Priam—all are there, of course—but I am choosing not to deal in the specifics rather to seek to pull forth a more general sense of happenings, emotional impacts, binding threads.

Again, I’ve asked each teller to choose ten word to evoke their piece.

The Struggle Over Patroclus: Nicole Lavigne

Book 17

Summons, armour, glittering, fate,

defend, war-cry, gods, bronze, chariots

death

A body lies on the field of battle. It is the body of a hero, clad in splendid armour, armour which may be stripped and taken as a prize. But the body is prize itself. In the hands of the enemy, it will be defiled.

 

The Struggle Over Patroclus (cont.): Phil Nagy

Book 17

Fighting, fighting, fighting

havoc caused by Zeus

horses weep, Patroclus, the field

The body must be defended. Defended unto death?  The larger cause continues but for the heroes the body has become the focus of all efforts. They struggle shrouded in mist while elsewhere on the battlefield the sun shines clear. 

 

 

 

The Struggle Over Patroclus (cont.): Mary Wiggin

Book 17

Din incessant, fire uncontrollable

Hector’s helmet flashing

A goddess intervenes

The body is heavy. Two men are needed to carry while others must protect their path of retreat. News of the death spreads, grief goes with it. And still, as if unending, there is the thunder of chariots, the clash of spear and sword on shield.

 

 IMAGES TO DREAM ON

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The pictures come from a museum in the king's stables at Versailles. The first is a Greek soldier, the second is actually of the horses of Apollo but it made me think so much of those immortal horses of Achilles who weep. The third shows Menelaus with the body of Patroclus. So deep the grief.

 

Tickets: NAC Box Office

References (11)

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    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
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    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: Belinda Broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: belinda broido
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
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    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -
  • Response
    Response: Dr. Rashmi Patel
    THE DAY UNFOLDS: SET THREE - Blogging the Iliad -

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